The Garden

Pond Garden

Pond Garden

An Informal area with an unlined pond which can dry up in summer and a smaller pool. These are part of the land drainage system and the water flows out to the river Caldew. The area is accessed by stone edged gravel pathways that help the garden sit into the Cumbrian landscape. There are views out into the fields beyond the garden. Plants include trees, shrubs, bulbs, ferns and perennials to provide interest throughout the season.

Woodland Garden

Woodland Garden

The pond garden joins the woodland garden which is currently being developed. There are a range of maturing trees which include Beech, Silver Birch, Rowan, Cherry and Sycamore. The woodland floor is not yet fully established and currently includes Pulmonaria, Polemium, Ajuga and Primula. There are bulbs beginning with the Snowdrops which are then followed by Daffodils. There is a bark path running through the woodland from which there is a good view of the pond garden. The woodland garden extends above the greenhouse into a small field where Amelanchier, Bird Cherry and Silver Birch are becoming established. The small field is surrounded by a native hedge.

The area below the small field often has running water through it and is part of the land drainage system. Plants in this area include Willow, Flag Iris, Hosta, Rodgersia and Ligularia.

Wild Wood Garden

Wild Wood Area

The old access drive into Deer Rudding passes through here and marking its side are mature Holly, Beech and Hawthorn. There are also small Damson trees which have self set from original trees, whilst these provide blossom in spring, there is not usually much fruit. The area has snowdrops, which are a welcome sight after the winter, Daffodils throughout the spring and in summer there are Lilies concentrated under a large Sycamore tree. There is an area of cover provided by Symphoricarpus which does creep and needs cutting back. However, as we let the grass grow in this area, and cut a path through it, it attracts wildlife and we have found evidence of deer and foxes.

Cutting Garden

Cutting Garden

This is a new area under development and will be experimental for a time. It is an area set aside for vegetables; has been used as a nursery bed to grow plants on; it will now be developed to include cut flowers. It is divided into manageable beds that can be accessed from gravel paths and this enables work to carry on in all weather. The land slopes towards the south west and benefits from being relatively warm. There is some shelter from winds that come from the fells.

Successes in 2017 - Artichoke, Potatoes, Shallots, Dahlias, Echinacea, Knautia and Marguerite. The plan going forward will be to introduce more annual and biennial ‘cut and come again’ plants to increase the productivity of the beds.

Ruins and Cobbled Yard

Ruins and Cobbled Yard

The “Original” Deer Rudding stands as a ruin within the garden. The house was abandoned in the 1930’s and due to standing empty it collapsed in on itself. There were two buildings, the house and barn, separated by a cobbled yard. The ruined rooms were emptied of the debris that filled them and the walls were pointed to stabilize them. There are two mounds within the area which were formed of the debris taken from the rooms; these are planted with Juniper, Lilac and Buddleia, chosen to cope with the alkali and sandy nature of the soil. Plants are allowed to self sow and this gives it an informal feel. There are climbers planted on warm walls so the sheltered nature of the site allows these to survive.

Rockery

Rockery

The rockery is extensive and its purpose is to manage a slope on the ground over a wide but short area. This faces towards the hills and has a south westerly aspect so it benefits from the sun. There are paths around it, enabling access to see what is growing and maintain the area. These paths are very much part of the design. The rockery provides colour over a long season. There is a section with winter heathers, there are the usual range of alpines and rockery plants, bulbs and in addition a few large perennials and shrubs. The structure is defined by the flow of the ground, position of the stones and small conifers planted within the area. The intention is to link to the ruins and cobbled yard. This is achieved with the materials used.

Lower Garden

Lower Garden

Dropping down from the rockery the lower garden is retained by dry stone walls and is largely grass with mixed shrub and perennial borders. The choice of plants in the long border is dictated by the heavy soil and its high moisture content due to water draining down from higher in the garden.

Nearer the house there is scope for a wider range of perennials as the border drains better - the soil is still heavy and we are working to improve it over time.

Rose - Mayflower supplied by David Austin.

Walled Garden

Walled Garden

The courtyard is a sheltered area between the cottage and barn. It has one very sunny border taken over by a Diorama which have self sowed. We are not sure when we will do something about this! Opposite is a very low maintenance area for plants which do well in shade - Ferns, Primula Denticulata, and a lovely variegated Holly bush which likes the area. The walled garden has a border surrounding a grassed area and has various aspects as a result of the dry stone wall. The main feature is a mixed shrub and perennial border.

Rear Drive

Rear Drive

This drive takes you from the main garden onto a green lane which runs along the south eastern perimeter of Deer Rudding garden and gives access to the river meadow. Set within the lawned area are a group of 3 Silver Birch trees and a small meadow area. Growing in the meadow area are Cammassia and Fritillaria bulbs. Several Yew line the drive and the intention is to keep the Yew clipped to provide structural interest along the drive. A bank up to the lawned area has a range of sedum plants to provide ground cover and there is a group of primula vialii plants which are striking when in flower.

The Green Lane

The Green Lane

Bound by a hedge with farmland beyond, the green lane provides a route around the south eastern perimeter and gives access to the river meadow and woodland areas. The lane is kept cut to define the route and along the way there are points of interest: a meadow area containing Birdsfoot Trefoil, Ox Eye Daisy, Teasel, Meadow Vetchling, Meadow Buttercup and Wild Carrot; A steep bank with a variety of shrubs and small trees including Cornus Kousa, Hazel, Cotoneaster and Philadelphus. There are two young trees which have been planted as investments for the future, namely a Sequoia Gigantum and an Evergreen Oak.

The River Meadow

The River Meadow

An informal area of meadow grass with mown paths set alongside the River Caldew. There are a range of trees and shrubs to provide structural interest and views into the adjacent farmland. In springtime there are some Daffodil and Camassia bulbs. The meadow grass is cut once each year, normally late July to early August. This allows seed to set and be distributed when the grass is cut. In the cutting regime the grass cuttings are removed. In September of 2016 Yellow Rattle seed was sown in some parts of the meadow grass and we are now waiting to see how the meadow develops.